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wsdl Articles
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WSDL Tales From The Trenches, Part 2
In a previous article ("WSDL Tales From the Trenches, Part 1"), I painted a big picture of web services design. As I said, Web Services Description Language (WSDL) only defines the syntax of how a web service may be invoked; it says nothing about its semantics. I will observe this distinction in what I say in this article about WSDL.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 3237  Category: Article    

WSDL First
Web services vendors will tell you a story if you let them. "Web services are a cinch," they'll say. "Just write the same code you always do, and then press this button; presto, it's now a web service, deployed to the application server, with SOAP serializers, and a WSDL descriptor all written out."

Type: WSDL  #Views: 3074  Category: Article    

WSDL Tales From the Trenches, Part 3
Namespaces were discussed briefly in the previous installment. There we asked the question, what goes into the WSD's target namespace. Here I address the question what goes into a W3C XML Schema namespace. The rules were briefly reviewed in the previous article, but here we go into more detail with the aid of some examples.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 3026  Category: Article    

WSDL Tales From The Trenches, Part 1
In all the attention that has been lavished on web services, it is often difficult to distinguish between vision and reality. This series will be short on vision and long on reality. It will not provide an overview of WSDL, and it also assumes familiarity with W3C XML Schema. This first article in the series considers what sound software engineering practice and distributed computing experience offer to web service design.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 1878  Category: Article    

Web Services User Guide
A Web service is a self-contained, modular application that can be accessed and used over a network connection using the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), Web Services Description Language (WSDL), and Extensible Markup Language (XML) open standards. Regardless of the programming language in which it has been implemented, a Web service can be accessed from many different platforms and operating systems, thus greatly enhancing the ability for diverse applications to share data.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 1825  Category: Article    

Microsoft & Web Services (SOAP)
About seven years ago, Microsoft started adding support for COM (Component Object Model) in all their products. The developer tools from Microsoft facilitated easy creation and consumption of COM objects; various APIs were upgraded from standard Windows calls to COM object methods; the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, etc.) and Internet Explorer browser were made automation enabled; to that end that even SQL Server supported COM (remember sp_OACreate and SQL DMO?).

Type: WSDL  #Views: 1267  Category: Article    

Microsoft & Web Services (SOAP)
About seven years ago, Microsoft started adding support for COM (Component Object Model) in all their products. The developer tools from Microsoft facilitated easy creation and consumption of COM objects; various APIs were upgraded from standard Windows calls to COM object methods; the Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, etc.) and Internet Explorer browser were made automation enabled; to that end that even SQL Server supported COM (remember sp_OACreate and SQL DMO?).

Type: WSDL  #Views: 1677  Category: Article    

WS-Security: Web services the secure way
Web Services themselves are not offering authentication and security services. The WS-Security standards can solve this issue.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 995  Category: Article    

A new approach to UDDI and WSDL, Part 2: Queries supported by the new OASIS UDDI WSDL Technical Note
This is the second article in a series of articles that relate to a new approach to using WSDL and UDDI, described in a new OASIS UDDI Technical Note. This article describes the types of UDDI query that can be issued against a UDDI model built according to the Technical Note.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 889  Category: Article    

Introducing WS-I and the Basic Profile
WS-I, the Web Services Interoperability Organization, was announced last February in a press release from IBM and Microsoft. The release actually had a byline of Armonk and Redmond, which are of course the corporate headquarters of the two companies. While there were nine founders, the shared byline reinforces the conventional wisdom identifying the original catalysts.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 818  Category: Article    

Examining WSDL
Unlike today's Web, web services can be viewed as a set of programs interacting cross a network with no explicit human interaction involved during the transaction. In order for programs to exchange data, it's necessary to define strictly the communications protocol, the data transfer syntax, and the location of the endpoint. For building large, complex systems, such service definitions must be done in a rigorous manner: ideally, a machine-readable language with well-defined semantics, as opposed to parochial and imprecise natural languages.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 935  Category: Article    

WSDL Tales From the Trenches, Part 3
This article is the third and final part of the WSDL Tales from the Trenches series, and in it I concentrate on the data in web services. More specifically, I examine the type definitions and element declarations in the types element of a WSDL document. Such types and elements are for use in the abstract messages, the message elements in a WSD.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 865  Category: Article    

WSDL Invocation Tools, Part II - Page 6
Our initial discussion of WSDL invocation tools focused on programming and command-line invocation tools. We now move on to even simpler tools that are entirely driven by a web-based interface.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 995  Category: Article    

SOAP Encodings, WSDL, and XML Schema Types
Using a web service involves a sender and a receiver exchanging at least one XML message. The format of that message must be defined so that the sender can construct it and the receiver can process it. The format of a message includes the overall structure of the tree, the local name and namespace name of the elements and attributes used in the tree, and the types of those elements and attributes.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 898  Category: Article    

Examining WSDL
Unlike today's Web, web services can be viewed as a set of programs interacting cross a network with no explicit human interaction involved during the transaction. In order for programs to exchange data, it's necessary to define strictly the communications protocol, the data transfer syntax, and the location of the endpoint. For building large, complex systems, such service definitions must be done in a rigorous manner: ideally, a machine-readable language with well-defined semantics, as opposed to parochial and imprecise natural languages.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 785  Category: Article    

Understanding Overloading in WSDL
Overloaded methods may or may not be what you need for the project you are working on. Additionally, there are those who argue that if a function is taking a different set of argument-types, then it should be noted by giving it a different name. But neither of these are the argument for learning how to express overloaded interfaces in WSDL. The reason is simple: languages, commercially in use today, support this feature. In order to correctly describe their interfaces using a description written in WSDL, it must be possible to describe an operation that has different calling syntaxes.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 894  Category: Article    

WSDL Tales From The Trenches, Part 2
In a previous article ("WSDL Tales From the Trenches, Part 1"), I painted a big picture of web services design. As I said, Web Services Description Language (WSDL) only defines the syntax of how a web service may be invoked; it says nothing about its semantics. I will observe this distinction in what I say in this article about WSDL.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 894  Category: Article    

Mining the intranet
One of my early uses of Web services, back in 1999, predated SOAP and WSDL. It was a script to calculate what I called Web mindshare. It combined Yahoo’s capability of enumerating sites in a category with AltaVista’s capability of counting inbound links to each of those sites. It was a primitive version of what Google, then in beta, went on to prove dramatically: Links measure authority. What interested me even more, though, was how easily that little script was able to compose a novel service — ranking everything in a category — from two existing but unrelated services.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 919  Category: Article    

W3C Enters Uncertain Waters with New Workflow Group
This month, the W3C officially began the process of exploring standards for the way web services will exchange business rules for workflow -- both within an enterprise and between businesses. But even before the working group holds its first meeting, political and technical rifts among vendors might limit the work's impact.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 947  Category: Article    

Java API for XML-based RPC (JAX-RPC): A Primer
The RPC (Remote Procedure Call) mechanism enables a remote procedure call from a client to be communicated to a remote server. An example use of an RPC mechanism is in a distributed client/server model. A server defines a service as a collection of procedures that are callable by remote clients. A client calls procedures to access service defined by the server.

Type: WSDL  #Views: 904  Category: Article    

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